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Phone and SMS Integration - keeping up with the competition and enhancing safety

Phone and SMS Integration - keeping up with the competition and enhancing safety

I have not seen any thread about the enhanced phone integration plans for the future for TM.

Many of the other manufacturers in the last several years have really escalated the technology to integrate phone features, especially relating to SMS function.

Undoubtedly SMS activity while driving exists, and the more safer it can be made for the driver without assistance from absent passengers the safer we will all be for it, preferably not having to fumble with our phone to read or respond.

Features such as reading out incoming texts, replying by voice dictation or even selecting from a template of pre-prepared responses would be a significant safety feature.

Currently in my Cayenne I can read or listen to incoming messages, but cannot reply other than calling or accessing my phone. However Ford, Jeep, Kia, Hyundai, Honda etc are already offering better features to reply safely.

Anybody else wish that TM would also advance this feature??? Obviously it should apply to android and iOS phones without prejudice, and Bluetooth is the most convenient way to do it although via a charging data cable would have additional benefits.

This should be an easy task for the TM Wizards...

johnse | 24 oktober 2015

This is a feature that the phones themselves are capable of providing. I have a 2 years old Windows phone that provides reading and voice reply to TXT messages as part of the Cortana digital assistant. A quick search shows that there are apps for both iOS and Android that will do the same even if they aren't built in.

I do not need or want Tesla to be worrying about such features that can be handled by the device built for communicating.

priustech | 24 oktober 2015

Maybe it's a great feature, however when cycling I hate the idea of people reading texts while they drive so close. Presumably superior to holding a cellphone in terms of safety, but still should be illegal to have the distraction.

vperl | 24 oktober 2015

My Moto 360 has all the functions you mentioned, just pair it to any Bluetooth enabled vehicle. Me thinks iApple has same... or next model like wireless charging. Took iApple several years to figure that out, progress...

bp | 24 oktober 2015

Other cars - including those at much lower prices than the Model S - have integrated text messaging - that will automatically read the incoming text message (using text-to-voice).

This is a significant safety feature - because without that, I have to pull my phone out of the console cradle, swipe the screen to unlock it, open up the text message window - and then try to read the text message.

If the car is stopped at a light - that's probably OK, but still is a distraction from monitoring the status of the stop light.

However, while the car is moving, that's clearly a major distraction - and one that is illegal in many places.

Tesla is far behind other manufacturers in this area - and with the new Apple and Android integration - they are going to fall increasingly further behind...

Farmer Dave | 24 oktober 2015

As I tweeted to EM, I would like to see bluetooth pairing to be set up as a primary link and a secondary link. When the primary link is not present, the car would pair to the secondary link.

That way two different drivers can have the benefit of a bluetooth link.

It doesn't seem very difficult.

gfb107 | 24 oktober 2015

The safest integration would block all SMS, email, and voice communication while the car is moving. Even voice to text and text to voice I would be a sognificant distraction. Just put the phone away while you're driving. Period.

teslagiddy | 25 oktober 2015

@gfb107,
+1

Gwgan | 25 oktober 2015

@gfb107,
-1

Roamer@AZ USA | 25 oktober 2015

hfs 107'
++++10000000000000

My pet peeve. People who think their text about a cat video is more important than everyone else's life. I can spit nails when I see people texting while wandering all over the road and driving 20 miles below the speed limit in the left lane. At least drunk drivers are actually trying to drive. People texting are trying to text rather than drive. Don't get me started on people that can't wait until a movie is over and just have to whip out their light saber phone and respond to a Facebook post about cute puppies.

Roamer@AZ USA | 25 oktober 2015

Time for bed. Was trying to drive and didn't see the auto correct of gfb to hfs.

Just kidding about the driving.

Roamer@AZ USA | 25 oktober 2015

Maybe we need to double speed limits so people have to drive rather than operate a mobile office.

Red Sage ca us | 25 oktober 2015

Roamer: I've been in favor of a 100 MPH minimum speed limit on Los Angeles Freeways for over two decades. If your vehicle can't do 100, don't get on. I figure after the first month or three of casualties, everyone who can't drive will get their asses on the bus where they belong.

bobby | 26 oktober 2015

@gfb107: -1. I am against over-reaching regulations. A ban on all usage of the cell phone is akin to the car manufacturer limiting the car's speed to the speed limit. Would you want a speed governor to never allow the car to exceed 55 mph? How about a car that will not allow you to turn it on because someone isn't wearing a seat belt? Or even worse, the car won't turn on because you've put something heavy in the front seat that gets detected as a person who needs their seat belt.

@Roamer@AZ: I am a surgeon. And when I am on call, I frequently get called by the hospital even while I am driving there. Sometimes it's "life or death"; and sometimes it's not, but they have an urgent question. When you are the patient, do you want to be told that we cannot reach the doctor because he is in his car and the government feels he should not be able to be reached by phone? Not everyone is looking at movies of puppies while they drive. Many people have legitimate need to use their phone even while driving.

I mean no offense or disrespect to your opinions, but realize how far reaching the consequences can be.

gfb107 | 26 oktober 2015

I didn't write anything about regulations of any kind. All I wrote was that even text-to-voice and voice-to-text can cause significant driver distraction. That is also true of voice calls. So I just suggested that the best way to be safe is to not use your phone while driving. If you need to use it, pull over. It is a matter of personal responsibility.

Roamer@AZ USA | 26 oktober 2015

@bobby, It will do little to help your patient if you are involved in an accident enroute. I draw the line at anything other than hands free calls. Even that is a hazard but at least you are looking out the windshield while you are distracted by the call. Dealing with texts and responding to texts is asking to die.

Everyday I encounter cars driving erratically only to see the driver face down texting furiously.

Your post is appropriate. I almost added that the only exception is life or death situations. Makes sense to risk your life texting if it is to save a life. But then it's probably safer to say call me when I am driving so I can look forward while being distracted.

Roamer@AZ USA | 26 oktober 2015

@Red Sage, After my first drive on the Autobahn I understood why German cars don't need cup holders. At 200 kph all you do is drive. Blinking your eyes is a luxury. Then the sports cars come up behind and you have to move right so they can blow by like your standing still.

Our conservative speed limits encourage distracted behavior.

bobby | 26 oktober 2015

Just to be clear: I **ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS*** try to use "hands-free" as much as possible. ESPECIALLY as a father, I try to model good behaviour such as avoiding texting/distracted driving. But sometimes there are critical time-sensitive emergent scenarios where "hands-free" isn't possible.

All I'm suggesting is to not paint with an overly broad brush, i.e. not everyone is looking up puppy videos. TBH, most people are probably looking up CAT vidoes.... [DUCKS FOR COVER] ;p

Either way, be safe and respectful, people. We're on the same team.

Roamer@AZ USA | 27 oktober 2015

gfb 107, Here is a test of digital addiction. Leave all your devices at home then see how far you can walk from your house before you break out in a cold sweat and have a panic attack.

MyXinTx | 29 oktober 2015

WOW. what a great gaggle of responses.

For those of you that think "no texting and driving", that is a great safety practice and a safe driving choice. So promise me you will never interact with your 17" tablet while you drive your Tesla, especially not surf the web.

If fact, my Porsche with a hundred fixed buttons and switches in the cockpit is safer than a T since I don't have to touch tabs to change pages to adjust the temperature or open the sunroof.

But face facts, people will text, and twitter, and listen to the radio, and surf the web (oh, just Tesla owners), etc whether you agree with it or not, wouldn't you prefer those unsafe drivers be minimally distracted while they do it?...without fumbling on their phones.

For those tech experts, you understand that connecting via bluetooth will only allow the internal phone features to work if your streaming audio to the car unless T creates a viable phone/text message interface...like most of the other car companies.

@bobby I hear you as I am an anesthesiologist and former Chief of Staff. We need to respond to nurses promptly, especially when a critical need arises...as our patients want us to.

Bottom line, it is a driver safety feature to streamline the phone/text integration process and those that don't want to use it won't.

Roamer@AZ USA | 29 oktober 2015

@WaitN, I won't address all your points. I pretty much only use the flat panel for NAV. The large clear map improves safety over the small crap maps in every other car. The browser is slow and would be ridiculous to use to do anything productive while driving. I think it is slow by design and that's a good thing.

As far as thousands of buttons, you hit the thing I hate the most about the legacy cars. I can't stand all the buttons and clutter with tiny emblems or labels I can't read. I have to put on reading glasses and lean into the dash just to turn anything on.

The Tesla flat panel is pure joy to use. It automates so many functions I seldom have to touch it for any reason when I drive. When I do need to make a selection it is easy to see, easy to read and painless to select. I rented a large MB SUV on a recent trip and found operating it with its thousands of small buttons pure hell. The backup camera was completly useless on the iPhone size screen.

All that said there are lots and lots of studies and data documenting how dangerous it is to you, your passengers and other motorists when you use your electronic distractions while driving. Be safe. It is not worth killing someone just to read a text.

johnse | 30 oktober 2015

@WaitN4myX For those tech experts, you understand that connecting via bluetooth will only allow the internal phone features to work if your streaming audio to the car unless T creates a viable phone/text message interface...like most of the other car companies.
Actually that is not the case.
With Cortana, when an sms message arrives, it behaves as if a call had come in. It initiates a connection to the car at that time.

The only need for intelligence in the car is to place a call--or imitate pushing the answer button on a headset.

On a Windows Phone 8.1 GDR1 or later, you can add Cortana's "number" (555-555-9876) to your address book and then "Call Cortana" will give you direct access to her capabilities.

bobby | 30 oktober 2015

Let's redirect the thread to some actual useful discussion. At this point, we're all basically agreeing to the same points from different angles.

So which ecosystem partners best with Tesla cars? iOS or Android?

Roamer@AZ USA | 30 oktober 2015

@WaitN, Here is an app to put that flat panel to work.

http://blog.wink.com/wink-blog/2015/10/28/eveconnect-brings-wink-to-tesl...

Red Sage ca us | 30 oktober 2015

My Brother's F-150 seems to be able to read a text message to him when it arrives, whether from a Windows Phone or Android device. He can reply audibly if he likes, or just say, 'IGNORE' and the service dismisses itself. I'm not sure if that is a function of the truck's systems or the phones he uses, but it might just be a service that works through T-Mobile and can be accessed via Bluetooth on anything.

Roamer@AZ USA | 30 oktober 2015

@bobby, With the browser built in you really will no longer need a phone system or vehicle based system. In the future will will just use an Internet service direct that is set up to accomplish what you want. Your system can be whatever someone chooses to create that works thru the car browser. No longer stuck with what the car manufacturer installed and never improved.

Things change fast.

bobby | 30 oktober 2015

True, I agree that would be the future state. But the sad reality of the present state is that software engineers (including the ones that programmed the Tesla OS) probably design for one system and then port it over to make it compatible with the other system.

This sad reality was made apparent to me when I bought Google Glass to pair with an iOS phone. Certain features only work with Android (and didn't work with the iOS phone I had at the time). So then, I decided to leave the walled-garden of Apple, and migrated to Android... Only to find out that Apple had trapped my text messages in the abyss of iMessage never to be released to my shiny new Android device. Bottom line: big problems trying to play both sides of the fence.

Anyhoo... long story short.... Does connectivity and integration with the Tesla car's OS work better with iOS or Android presently? I am hoping to avoid another Glass-like fiasco where certain features just don't work with certain phones.

B