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Apple car play

Apple car play

Will Tesla ever incorporate or add Apple CarPlay so that I can have Siri read text and originate text messages while driving. Of course it would be great to have apps like audible and other apps that are built into CarPlay. Being an Apple enthusiast and wanting my iPhone Xs max to be fully integrated is not too much to ask for what is probably the most high tech car on the road.

NKYTA | 16. mars 2019

Not likely. Plenty of previous posts on this, some want it, some don’t.

TeslaTap.com | 16. mars 2019

One thought is Tesla is very strong on safety. Some reports show texting (even by voice) is so distracting it is equivalent to driving drunk - not very good for safety. Other automakers just don't care - great if you total your car and have to buy a new one - more money in their pocket.

Anyway, much more pro/con here: https://teslatap.com/articles/carplay-on-tesla/

And a super long thread here: https://forums.tesla.com/forum/forums/vote-support-apple-carplay-teslas

carlk | 16. mars 2019

Tesla has a very good voice activated navigation system. Everything else when driving a car is not necessary. Although do have voice activated phone call and music selection. Texting is just too much of a distraction. I actually wonder why no one has filed lawsuit against auto companies or Apple when they got into an accident while voice texting,

Clifspears | 17. mars 2019

OK - so let's assume the idea of texting and driving is BAD - what about having the car (SIRI) read your incoming text and then being able to make the decision to pull over to respond. So, now what's your argument - chewing gum and walking at the same time - listening to Audible (audio on books) - I agree studies have shown that the VAST majority of drivers are NOT tuned in to driving while behind the wheel even if there are not additional distraction other than mental distractions. I am definitely reconsidering my order - I want my iPhone heavily integrated into the car in every way possible.

carlk | 17. mars 2019

You should definitely buy another car and give your entire life to Apple.

kishan.psd | 17. juli 2019

@Clifspear Don't bother man, this forum seems fabricated, Bunch of marketing guys answers here, I want the same thing as you do, checkout this
https://forums.tesla.com/forum/forums/apple-maps-and-siri-support-model-3

EVRider | 17. juli 2019

@kishan.psd: If you think this forum is fabricated and we're all Tesla marketing guys, why do you use it? I guess if we don't agree with you, we must be "fake news" -- why does that sound oddly familiar? :-)

blue adept | 17. juli 2019

The short answer is that Apple products are simply far too invasive, requiring an almost continuous connection with their "mother ship" leading to a host of all manner of security, functionality and privacy issues.

Driver distraction entails a whole other set of issues in and of itself, driver and public safety foremost.

Distractions are not something anyone 'needs' when operating a 3,000 lb., upwards to 6,500 lb., vehicle, especially one traveling at rates up to 75-80+ miles an hour.

Simple, basic, every day common sense, people, just common sense.

Kraigstl | 19. juli 2019

I am a HUGE Apple CarPlay fan. I never thought I would ever own another vehicle without it. I was concerned I wouldn’t have the same type of access or features once I bought my Tesla Model 3.

But I can now say that I was wrong. Not only does the Tesla interface offer me more features/functionality, I can still access everything I used on Apple CarPlay, and I can do it all hands free with Siri.

I turned on the Siri Voice Activation feature and can now ask Siri to send a text, make a call, read message, etc

blue adept | 19. juli 2019

@Kraigstl

Bluetooth is such a benefit to those who're tech savvy enough to know how to make use of it.

blakamp | 20. juli 2019

CarPlay and Android Auto... good in theory, tough in execution. Clunky. If I were Tesla, I wouldn’t do it.

nukequazar | 20. juli 2019

@carlk
"Tesla has a very good voice activated navigation system"

No, it's really pretty rudimentary. No AI, just basic commands. Maybe compared to Siri/CarPlay 3-4 years ago, sure, but my other (ICE) car has CarPlay and I drive it about once/week and it's like a breath of fresh air using CarPlay and Apple Maps over Tesla Infotainment. CarPlay is just so much better. Voice texts, my music library onscreen, my podcast library onscreen, route options in navigation, on and on... Everything you need in a small, focused window.

Please no more "Tesla love it or leave it" comments. Really unhelpful. We love our Teslas but there is much room for improvement especially in the Nav, Infotainment, and user interface.

nukequazar | 20. juli 2019

...and the telephone interface is like 2019 vs 1990. With CarPlay when I'm on a call I see all the info there onscreen throughout the call. I don't have to find the phone app if I need to send a touchtone, mute, hold, etc. I can send the extension that's stored with the number with a tap, add a conference call, easily see my contacts, etc. No, I'm not doing all this stuff while driving in traffic but it is there in large font on a single, focused screen, when needed. Apple CarPlay has optimized safety and usability of infotainment, IMO.

EVRider | 20. juli 2019

I think for most of us this isn't about Apple CarPlay vs. the Tesla technology. If CarPlay was an option for people who wanted to use it, I don't think anyone would mind, as long as it didn't take anything away from people who didn't want to use it. The chances of us getting CarPlay are pretty slim, but that's besides the point.

nukequazar | 20. juli 2019

@EVRider, I don't know of any car or third-party system where CarPlay takes anything away from anyone who doesn't use it. I think the best scenario, at this point, would be if CarPlay would come up as an app just like Slacker or TuneIn Radio or the browser or the phone, etc.

blakamp | 20. juli 2019

@nukequazar

I may not think as highly about CarPlay as you do, but I'll second the "love it or leave it" comment. Agree it's not helpful, and that we can simultaneously love our Tesla's and recognize places where there's room for improvement.

nothotpocket | 20. juli 2019

It's not going to happen in any reasonable timeframe.

I'd love to be as positive as the rest of the commenters about the Tesla interface, but I spend time driving another car that has Apple CarPlay / Android Auto, so I know how much better those systems are. Tesla's is way prettier, though.

But it's not going to happen unless Tesla is forced into it by the competition, and honestly, there's still no competition.

blakamp | 21. juli 2019

100% true. Further, while there is no real competition, I nonetheless think there are a couple motivations for Tesla to start focusing on it...

1) Autonomy. If Tesla believes some form of autonomy is within, say, 1-5 years, that changes usage needs in the car dramatically. In the autonomous scenario, infotainment becomes “the new steering wheel” as the primary engagement focus. I’m surprised Tesla is not more (visibly) focused on Infotainment upgrades as a signal on the autonomous front alone.

2) Safety. The current interface forces me to pick up my phone way more than I should. Between lack of Spotify support, voice interface limitations and bugginess around podcasting, I’m forced to interact through my phone a lot. That creates safety issues that other manufacturers have prioritized solving.

3) Buyer profile expansion. If Tesla wants to extend into new buyer profiles/segments, it can do so by leveraging infotainment. Through their SiriusXM and Tunein partnerships, Tesla actually has an amazing foundation of Sports content that is basically invisible and unnoticed right now. Elevating sports in the interface stands to expand buyer segments and generate buzz with new audiences. Bringing Sports forward more visibly could be particularly high value alongside the pickup reveal.

4) Economics. Tesla has a meaningful economic opportunity ahead embedded in its infotainment systems from AppStore, advertising capabilities, partner integrations, wallet services and referral fees, to name a few.

IMO, there is a relatively straightforward path to execute on the above. Though parts of the post are a bit dated now, I went into detail on that in a Medium post here:

Upgrading Tesla’s Vehicle Entertainment System (long-read)
https://medium.com/@brian.lakamp/tesla-take-enhancing-teslas-entertainme...

More recently, I published more succinct pieces that highlight things I’d like to see addressed in the short term and longer-term approach recommendations around an App Store.

Six Upgrades for the Tesla Entertainment Experience
https://medium.com/@brian.lakamp/six-upgrades-for-the-tesla-entertainmen...

Tesla Arcade and Automotive OS’s
https://medium.com/@brian.lakamp/tesla-arcade-and-automotive-oss-c0f6ef6...

FWIW... Contrary to another forum user’s assertion on a different thread that I seek some sort of profit from those posts, I don’t. In fact, I don’t make any money off those. I simply offer my contribution toward the continued evolution of the Tesla platform... of which I am an enormous fan.

nukequazar | 21. juli 2019

Great articles, @blakamp. I think the bottom line is there is just a troubling arrogance here with Tesla. Tesla is an energy and transportation company, and a very young one at that. Tesla has done unbelievable things in a short time. If only all corporations had such ambition, we could solve so many problems in this world. However, it is hard to imagine that Tesla will ever catch up in areas that companies like Apple have focused on for decades and continue to grow and innovate in. Even as we talk about CarPlay it is currently in beta with big improvements while Tesla infotainment is barely usable in comparison. It is, in fact, unusable for most people's music and podcast libraries. And the telephone and messaging interfaces are dangerously behind the curve.

TeslaTap.com | 21. juli 2019

There are two critical issues - Apple want to be a direct competitor to Tesla. Why would Tesla give all it's owner and vehicle information to Apple, or ceed the primary user interface to Apple? I'm not saying CarPlay isn't useful or desirable, but unless Apple kills it's vehicle program, I think it would be foolish for Tesla to integrate CarPlay.

Other car makers are so far behind Tesla in the UI/infotainment area, that they really had no choice but to go with CarPlay. It makes those truly dreadful systems somewhat tolerable.

nukequazar | 21. juli 2019

@TeslaTap.com, I don't think any of us wants or expects CarPlay or Android Auto to be a primary interface. We just want access to our digital life while driving without having to pick up our phones and deal with an unlimited, dangerous, interface while driving. We just want to see CarPlay (or Android Auto) available onscreen. BMW has a tiny screen so when CarPlay comes up, it uses the screen. The Tesla screen is huge, and has functions that are necessary to driving, so I think we only want CarPlay or AA available in a window.

As for paying a licensing fee, that is just silly. I put a Pioneer deck pin my 21-year-old BMW. The deck cost $400 for the hardware, including a CD/DVD player and the CarPlay license so it couldn't cost much. Also, I would be happy to pay $100 to turn CarPlay on in my Model S.

As for competition, I really don't think adding a CarPlay app in a Tesla is going to make people buy an Apple Car in 5 years. Wait, even as I type that I realize, that's COMPLETELY SILLY. If anything, lack of CarPlay, forcing us to fumble through a wholly inadequate music, podcast, messaging, and telephony system, will push people to BUY an Apple Car in 5 years!

blakamp | 21. juli 2019

Personally, I would much rather see Tesla integrate services like Spotify, Apple Music, iHeartRadio, Pandora, MLB, etc natively and cleanly, than to bolt on CarPlay. I’d like to see something akin to a Tesla’s version of Sonos. There is so much amazing innovation and differentiation to be achieved there. I’d hate to see Tesla cede its opportunity to 3rd party franken-integrations, and I don’t think they should.

Nonetheless, I agree with @nukequazar to the extent that if Tesla is not committed to that level of development of the infotainment system, I would take CarPlay and call it a win., just to minimize the number of times I’m forced to interact with my phone under the current system... though it’d break my spirit daily to “endure” a Tesla solution (like CarPlay) other than a kickass version of what I consider the “right” way as described above.

nukequazar | 21. juli 2019

The root problem, as I see it, is that our digital/data lives are anchored by our phone accounts as the hub, whether associated with Apple or Google. Our lives are not centered around our cars which we maybe spend an hour or two per day in, 5-6 days per week. Of course some speed more time than that in their cars but when we leave our car, we leave our car but the phone stays with us. Therefore we need to be able to interface well with our phone-based data while in the car rather than adjusting to some alternate universe with little relationship to the rest of our lives.

No matter how great of an infotainment system Tesla creates, it will never follow us into the office, into the restaurant, and home with us for the night and weekend. No matter how many streaming choices or apps we can sign into in the car, it just won't cut it. We need a real connection to the critical data we use daily/hourly/by the minute, in our personal and business lives.

I don't see Tesla ever putting in API's for Apple Music, Apple Podcasts, Apple Messaging, Apple Contacts, Apple Calendar, and Apple Phone into the Tesla screen (plus Goodle versions of each). Therefore we need to have a decent, safe way to access our phone-based accounts while driving, and as far as I know, CarPlay (or AA) is the safest and most integrated way to so this while leaving the rest of the driving experience to the car.

blakamp | 21. juli 2019

I don’t agree with that premise. The phone might be a useful authentication tool, but I don’t agree that it need be the anchor/source of everything.

Look at smart TVs. Casting and phone-anchored solutions certainly haven’t won the day. I simply log into a set of relevant apps, native to the TV OS, that sync with the cloud, so that when I login and do something it is reflected in all other access points. With smart TVs, we’re headed to a world where the key players (Roku, FireTV and Apple) are increasingly defining the experience for content participants and moving to SSO.

You may be right about Apple Music and Apple Podcasts, but players like Spotify, Deezer, Pandora, Stitcher, iHeartRadio and MLB will likely do it.

blue adept | 21. juli 2019

@nukequazar, @nothotpocket

@Kraigstl has just pointed out that they're able to access the very same features and functionality (and way more) as those they're able to use with Apple's Auto / 'Car'Play through the Siri platform on their phones in conjunction with Tesla's Remote S interface (which resolves your "Safety" concern @blakamp), so I'm not understanding the reason for your discontentment unless, of course, it is due to your own self-remorse for being unaware of how to enable this functionality...?

I'm inclined to agree with @EVRider although, as @blakamp and I covered in another conversation (where I also told him of a way to integrate the Spotify streaming media platform into Tesla's infotainment subsystem: https://www.teslarati.com/how-to-play-spotify-tesla-music-streaming/), Tesla will be rolling out its' own digital music streaming platform:

https://www.digitalmusicnews.com/2017/06/23/tesla-spotify/

Until then, owners could always make use of Tesla's Remote S app to enable voice Siri functionality for hands free operation of a variety of functions:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZc8qMNiONo

So the discussion of whomever's this or that preference of streaming music player is, or their desire for enhanced functionality to enable hands-free operation, are moot issues at this point and a waste of our time, you know, like beating a dead horse.

The thing about all of these apps, besides their addictive properties and specifically designed indispensability, is that all of them contain what are known as "backdoors" that have been put there (written into their "code") by their developers (for applying updates, revisions, patches and "bug" fixes) that are accessible to and exploited by "hackers" motivated by nefarious intent.

As I've expressed to you before, your continuing efforts to push these apps are becoming increasingly suspect, @blakamp, VERY suspect indeed given that our earlier conversation should have put this issue to rest for you, you know, but for your intentions to encourage the adoption of these app choices of yours, so your efforts raise the question of your true motivations as I've mentioned before.

blue adept | 21. juli 2019

YOU. NEED. TO. LET. THIS. GO.

Tesla simply isn't going to make use of or be coerced into using anything that might compromise it's security because they, necessarily, place their owners safety and data security above all else, including individual preferences or trendiness.

nothotpocket | 21. juli 2019

@blue

None of us think it's going to change and there's no need write a screed or get all caps about defending the Tesla position to not integrate Android Auto or Apple CarPlay.

We sometimes just like to groan about what we consider to be an obvious defect in an outstanding vehicle. That's all. I could point out the list of things these systems can do that Tesla can't, but why bother? Tesla isn't going to change their position (until they do, and that will have nothing to do with any of us).

blue adept | 22. juli 2019

@nothotpocket

And my point is that I do not understand how anyone could consider a service / app / functionality / feature that Tesla has chosen not to include in their vehicles (unarguably the most technologically advanced automobiles on the road today) "an obvious defect", especially after certain exploits and vulnerabilities of those systems / platforms have been pointed out complete with links to authorities that both verify and validate their exclusion.

Perhaps you overlooked the part of my comments where I mentioned:

'The thing about all of these apps, besides their addictive properties and specifically designed indispensability, is that all of them contain what are known as "backdoors" that have been put there (written into their "code") by their developers (for applying updates, revisions, patches and "bug" fixes) that are accessible to and exploited by "hackers" motivated by nefarious intent.'

And that's in addition to the other shortcomings I've pointed out earlier in the conversation.

Clearly these critics of Tesla lack the intelligence, knowledge, or experience, to make such assessments and so, should STFU at risk of offending those that actually do and drawing their ire or, at the very least, learn how to articulate their opinions in a less offensive manner.

'Defect', pfft!

bp | 22. juli 2019

The current smartphone integration is very minimal.

The lack of text-to-voice and voice-to-text for text messages and e-mails means that some Tesla drivers are interacting with their smartphones - while driving. Even while the vehicle is operating under AutoPilot, this increases safety risks - since AutoPilot is still only a driver assistance system and requires driver monitoring.

Tesla (Musk) promised Tesla would provide a 3rd party app store before the first Model S was sold. It was in the early screen shots - and disappeared at Model 3 introduction. Musk periodically mentioned that 3rd party apps would be supported - and that never happened.

While Tesla could provide a 3rd party API (programming interface) for applications to run on the console processor, there are two major flaws in that strategy. First, unless Tesla has built in a secure environment in which those apps can run and guarantee they can't impact vehicle operations, the security risk for running 3rd party apps would be unacceptable. Second, even with Tesla's increasing production rate, Tesla vehicles are still a relatively small percentage of the market, which would discourage very many app developers from investing in apps that would only run in Tesla vehicles.

Musk commented several years ago the better strategy would be to implement screen mirroring (likely with a 3rd party system or a Tesla implementation - not Apple CarPlay or Android Auto). This would significantly increase the number of apps available through the Apple and Google app stores (like Audible).

All other manufacturers will be providing these capabilities in their EVs. The lack of these features are a safety risk (for those drivers who use their smartphones while driving). And with Tesla shift towards providing more entertainment features (arcade games, streaming video while parked) that will be more important when FSD is available, it seems inevitable Tesla will have to provide this capabilitiy - whether using the Apple/Google solutions or an alternative.

And, based on how Tesla normally releases new major functionality, it's very likely we won't know about this until Tesla is ready to release it...

blakamp | 22. juli 2019

Yes, API access certainly requires a cordoning off for security purposes. Given that Slacker, TuneIn and Spotify are already integrated, I would expect that such measures have been undertaken. Lest I rely on assumptions, I’m interested to understand the technical reality of these integrations better.

On your point about unit volumes driving partner integration decisions, yes. That is true, though several of the relevant players would do it simply because its Tesla, rather than a pure volume calculus.

In my view, the casting approach is better in theory than in reality. There are a lot of edge cases and rough edges in that approach. Usability issues. User education requirements. Latency issues tend to show up visibly. The Smart TV space bears that out with Chromecast. If casting were a slam dunk strategy, AppleTV would have banked on that with tight iPhone integration, and it nonetheless primarily pursues a native app approach.

As for suggestions above to use SIri + Bluetooth combo for hands free, Apple seemingly decided long ago not to enable Siri control of Spotify, which limits the value of that. Regardless, it’s a solution geared to those more technically clever than the average driver.

@blue adept — Regarding your comment:
“Clearly these critics of Tesla lack the intelligence, knowledge, or experience, to make such assessments and so, should STFU at risk of offending those that actually do and drawing their ire or, at the very least, learn how to articulate their opinions in a less offensive manner.”

It’s humorously inconsistent (at best) for someone to throw out the accusation of “lack the intelligence” and “STFU” alongside a recommendation to “learn how to articulate their opinions in a less offensive manner” ...in the same paragraph. I admit though, I am curious about the experience from which you draw to take your positions so aggressively and authoritatively.

TabascoGuy | 22. juli 2019

@blakamp - AI only has memory, not experience.

bentwookie | 22. juli 2019

CarPlay just sends a video stream to the head unit where it's rendered (in hardware). If there was a backdoor somewhere, it'd affect your phone, not your car.

nukequazar | 22. juli 2019

@bentwookie, is that true, for sure? If so then there is absolutely no reason not to have a CarPlay window on the Tesla screen other than some personal issues between Apple and Tesla, at the expense of our safety and utility while driving.

blue adept | 23. juli 2019

@bp

Thing is, no one is suppose to be using their phones or checking their messages or reading their texts or populating their playlists or whatever the hell other thing it is they're not suppose to be doing WHILE THEY'RE DRIVING!**

That's why I cannot understand why these people (@blakamp, @nukequazar, @nothotpocket) are so callously overlooking this fact.

It's like they're arguing from the viewpoint of some alternate fantasy realm where full vehicle autonomy has already been realized &/or implemented and the engagement of such indulgences would actually be possible when, in reality, all that we've available to us at this point is the augmented form of conventional 'cruise control', known as "AutoPilot", which still requires our full time, distraction-free attention and interaction.

Yes, there was talk of a much earlier deployment of certain enhanced functionalities, then a bunch of chip flaws were detected in a number of the micro-architectures of manufacturer's chips that hosted a whole series of exploits and prompted not only a delay of the roll out, but also necessitated discontinued use of NVidia chipsets altogether in ALL of Tesla's electronics in favor of moving chip design, development and manufacture, 'in-house' to both ensure the security of their vehicle's operations and facilitate the eventual deployment of full vehicle autonomy:

https://threatpost.com/nvidias-tegra-chipset-attack/146561/
https://nvidia.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4611/~/security-bull... (Notice how they worded the vulnerability as "speculative"?!)

https://wccftech.com/tesla-finally-dumps-nvidia-claims-their-own-chip-is...
https://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2018/08/02/tesla-custom-self-dr...

Obviously these unforeseen developments, understandably, delayed the release of the 'promised' features and prompted the complete reformulation and redesign of the code architecture and support infrastructure of those services which, BTW, isn't an all that easy thing to do and not something that can be rushed.

Also, while Musk might have mentioned developing a form of 'screen mirroring' (aka, "casting") in order to enable the integration of third-party apps, it has been revealed that this technique, too, has its' own inherent flaws and exploits:

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/jpgdzb/hackers-could-break-into-your-...

So that idea was also scraped as a not at all viable strategy of app integration out of consideration for owner's safety and vehicular security.

In consideration of all of the above in addition to all of the flack and BS Elon and Tesla are confronted with daily from short sellers, fraudsters and propaganda peddlers, the only viable strategy, obviously, is for Tesla to not only develop and produce its' own chipsets, but also its own infotainment and app platform, which is in the works as it were:

https://www.digitalmusicnews.com/2017/06/23/tesla-spotify/

So 'patience' is the catchphrase of the day, people, as Tesla places all of our safety and security as their foremost objective.

**I also advocate the passing of legislation that outlaws the use of phones while the car is in operation &/or gear (ALL phones because a passenger could always pass one to the driver) and mandates the installation of a device that disables said phones while the car is in operation (for those particularly stubborn &/or ignorant &/or irresponsible &/or callous types).

blue adept | 23. juli 2019

@blakamp

I've been displaying my "experience" all throughout this and other threads in the form of my authority backed insights into the various pratfalls associated with the integration or usage of all of these ultimately insignificant &/or impractical artifices you erroneously feel Tesla is lacking in and, yes, I do have a problem with belligerent idiocy which is reflected in the expression of my frustration with yours.

I mean, how can you continue to sit there and insist on the veracity of this or that function &/or platform when I've posted links to reporting authorities who've exposed those very apps to be riddled with flaws and exploits, do you have issues with reading comprehension or are you actually just that damn incompetent?

blue adept | 23. juli 2019

@bentwookie

You really should do a bit more reading &/or research before you decide to offer an opinion as an exploit can be propagated across ALL devices 'tethered' to the compromised device via a variety of techniques, one of which is a process that is referred to as "jailbreaking".

You can read (and learn) about it here:

https://www.usenix.org/system/files/conference/usenixsecurity14/sec14-pa...

Just looking out.

blue adept | 23. juli 2019

@nukequazar

No, it is definitely NOT true...See above for explanation ^ ^ ^ ^

blakamp | 23. juli 2019

@blue

Your demonstration of experience is that you sent out links?

One of the links was to an article about a Spotify hack. So answer me this: If Spotify is a risk, then how is it that the implementation in European vehicles isn’t already an attack surface?

Along that line of reasoning, why wouldn’t SiriusXM, TuneIn and Slacker in the US be potential attack surfaces as well? Those services are certainly not immune to security issues.

nukequazar | 23. juli 2019

@blue adept, your dogmatic nonsense is hilarious. When asked about the foundation of your authority, you basically say you have the authority because you have the authority. You beg the question. A circular argument. Cute.

re. “Thing is, no one is suppose to be using their phones or checking their messages or reading their texts or populating their playlists or whatever the hell other thing it is they're not suppose to be doing WHILE THEY'RE DRIVING!**”

You’re just wrong. There are laws requiring hands free use but not outlawing all use of mobile devices while driving. There may be a place with such a law but general, no, you are wrong.

About the research article about iOS. Nice. iOS is probably the most secure of all such consumer systems but of course there is a possibly of anything being hacked. That paper supports this, looks at a very focused case of a counterfeit app being installed during an iTunes sync which basically nobody does anymore and iTunes is about to disappear. Congrats a in finding that irrelevant article. You has to search hard to find any risk of iOS hacking.

And you say you explain why @bentwookie is wrong except that you don’t. At all.

nukequazar | 23. juli 2019

@bmue adept, the use of mobile information technology in the car is not going to stop so we have to find safer ways to use it. This is what CarPlay provides: a pared down interface for music, podcasts, mapping, messaging, and telephony that leverage an interface that people are invested in and extremely familiar with, requiring minimal visual or manual interaction. One of the keys is that it is associated with the system that its user are already so familiar with that its use is nearly second nature therefore minimizing distraction. When I use Tesla’s apps, I am endlessly fumbling around because these are not the all’s I use the other 23 hours per day and have become intimately familiar with over many years.

Now do you get it? Or can you not read or comprehend the obvious depth of my knowledge, experience, and authority with which I enlighten your ignorance... :D

NKYTA | 23. juli 2019

Not jumping all in to support @blue. But...

The Mythbusters showed that there seems to be very little difference when talking on a cell phone vs handsfree talking, re: distractedness.

nukequazar | 23. juli 2019

@NKYTA, that’s an N=2 and totally not scientific. We’ll see as time goes by and these technologies mature.

blakamp | 23. juli 2019

From where I sit, the train has left the station on drivers (or passengers) making calls in the car. I don’t think that’s up for debate.

Unfortunately, there are also still too many reasons for average users to pick up the phone, beyond just making a call. CarPlay is one path that reasonably takes a step toward solving that. Admittedly, given a choice, I’d prefer continued evolution of the native platform to optimize the touch and voice interfaces toward simpler, yet increasingly powerful, controls.

Ultimately, autonomy should relieve the pressure on safety issues related to the phone. At that point, I believe primary focus will turn to the infotainment system, which is why I believe long-term evolution of the native platform is important. (Strategically for someone like Tesla, it also presents a path to add to network value and further leverage network effects.)

Some might reasonably argue that the phone, not the native auto infotainment system, will become the primary interaction surface once autonomy arrives. That’s fodder for a good debate and discussion. I tend to believe that the history of smart TV platforms points toward elevated value of tech native to the platform, over value of the phone as an external control point.

nothotpocket | 24. juli 2019

@nuke has got it down. The primary benefits of CarPlay and Android Auto are not in the texting or phone calls.

blue adept | 25. juli 2019

@blakamp & @nukequazar

Not being a narcissist, or insecure, or in any need of notoriety, celebrity or fame, I'm not one for bragging or boasting about my abilities, skillsets, or accomplishments, nor am I trying to impress anyone, only look out.

Just suffice it to say that I am known for being a wearer of many hats and let it go at that, afterall, this isn't about me, it's about Tesla Motors.

As for my posting links to authorities that address issues under discussion...

There is no point, nor rationale, in futilely wasting my efforts in relaying what is already common knowledge to everyone in the various cyber communication and media platforms and services areas, albeit even the general public-at-large, especially when your audience isn't exactly interested in listening to your perception of the explanations or rationale behind the motivations for this or that action of Tesla because they're only focused on championing their cause and are oblivious to both reason and factual input.

My point is only to demonstrate the susceptibility of current apps and media services on the market to exploitation by certain bad actors among us, for whatever purpose, by way of providing supporting validation and/or reasoning for Tesla's decision to design their own streaming and app platform in-house for eventual integration and use in their vehicles by providing information from reporting authorities that uncovered and disclosed them and/or their various vulnerabilities, from the 'horses mouth' as it were, to satiate your and other's curiosity or frustration over not having your whims and fancies catered to, or fragile egos coddled no doubt.

One can only presume that Spotify's European exploit has been patched or, perhaps, Tesla has written some lines of code preventing such intrusions, providing an additional layer of system's protection in the process (@blakamp)...Yay Tesla!

Much the same is likely the case for the other platforms you mentioned, that, or they simply haven't been revealed yet.

Oh, I see you've chosen to overlook my post script ("p.s.") wherein I championed the passage of legislation prohibiting the use of phones and/or cellular devices while a car is in operation just so you could manufacture a point of contention, how convenient for you (@nukequazar).

You can call it "dogmatic" if you want to or not, but it's really just that I don't have any problem with reading or keeping up with emerging trends or issues in the areas that are of interest to me, I think it's a discipline known as "learning", you really should try it some time, @nukequazar.

Also, it is through no fault of my own that you lack the ability to comprehend my explanation for @bentwookie's error, I mean, I did the best that I could considering the circumstances, especially since I posted an article outlining the exploitation technique in specific detail.

Alas, you can lead a horse to water but you cannot make it drink.

Finally, that has been my point all along, i.e., Tesla's efforts to design safer ways to engage and cater to the commuter's convenience, leisure and entertainment, all without posing a threat to them or others.

Like with all new experiences, there is always a learning curve...You've learned how to interact with the other apps and platforms and you'll come to learn how to interact with Tesla's all in due time @nukequazar and @blakamp, that is, if you're ever even Tesla owners.

Same goes for you, @nothotpocket.

blue adept | 25. juli 2019

@NKYTA

+1

I appreciate the effort.

blakamp | 25. juli 2019

@blue adept

One of your linked articles is from 2014 and another from 2017. You need more current references. You also need to tone down your personal attacks on other people’s intelligence and experience. I’m not clear why being a “wearer of many hats” elevates your standing above others.

I’d be surprised if Tesla were to develop Tesla Tunes (your 2017 article) as a completely new music service at this point in its trajectory. I don’t think that’d go terribly well, nor would it solve for the fact that most folks use Spotify, Apple Music or Amazon Music. The issue highlighted on this thread will still remain.

Every system has security vulnerabilities. If Tesla solved whatever issue may have existed with Spotify, then I don’t see the rationale (other than relative priorities against resources) for not extending that to the US... or enabling other integrations in a sandboxed manner. I suspect Tesla will do so eventually.

Time will ultimately prove or disprove all.

carlk | 25. juli 2019

The more I hear people say I can do this or that with CarPlay the more I'm convinced laws should restrict if not outright ban the use of it until perhaps self driving car is ready. You won't be needing that by then anyway. Checking your text messages? Why the hell you want to do that while driving your car? What message can be more important than your and others' lives?

TeslaTap.com | 25. juli 2019

@carlk +1 Sadly some people are so addicted to texting they can't spend a second away from the phone, even when driving. While the darwin principle may take care of some of those people, the other innocent lives they kill along the way is disharting.

racrosby31 | 25. juli 2019

Hey guys, a noob question. Does Tesla need something like https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.motordata.obd or it has got a built-in OBD?

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