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"We'll work harder." - Elon on Australia's 60 Minutes

"We'll work harder." - Elon on Australia's 60 Minutes

And I believe him. I found Elon's reaction to learning of Australian's energy costs very endearing. I hope he succeeds in making a difference there.

Relevant part of the interview at 12:05

https://youtu.be/fI2vgSHSXI8

Silver2K | 30. oktober 2017

wow, musk starting tearing when told of hardships

Tesla-David | 30. oktober 2017

Amazing clip, thanks @KP in NPT for sharing. Elon is spot on! I live in Edmonds, Wa, and live in all electric home with solar. We did an energy efficiency retrofit to our 1987 home and reduced our electric bill down to $180/year. Hard to listen to the pain and suffering of Australians with very high poser bills, when they have so much potential with solar/wind and battery backup systems.

Tesla-David | 30. oktober 2017

poser = power

KP in NPT | 30. oktober 2017

It's worth it to watch the entire show (it's Australia's 60 minutes) - I had no idea energy was so expensive there. Especially considering how they regularly must deal with blackouts.

rgrant | 30. oktober 2017

Yeah - that was intense. He’s a man with a mission. Nice to see a sense of social justice in him.

SamO | 31. oktober 2017

Neil Armstrong /Gene Cernan

"I was very sad to see that. I wish they would come and visit. I think that would change their mind."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8P8UKBAOfGo

KP in NPT | 31. oktober 2017

He's a softie. Explains his falling fast for the ladies. ;)

SamO | 31. oktober 2017

He's very sensitive to suffering. He considers those astronauts his heroes and to see them disprespect his dreams for space, is hurtful.

And he also has imagination. When he was told that people in Australia were literally choosing between eating and turning on the lights, he could imagine the suffering.

Elon is truly an excellent human and (even if they barely deserve it) humanity is lucky that he doens't just throw his arms up in exasperation.

눈_눈

carlk | 31. oktober 2017

His mission has absolutely been to save the mankind. He's right from the beginning that we can't avoid the dire situation unless we transition to renewable energy. That was even before the global warming was an issue.

sp_tesla | 31. oktober 2017

carlk | October 31, 2017
His mission has absolutely been to save the mankind. He's right from the beginning that we can't avoid the dire situation unless we transition to renewable energy.

+10.

Tropopause | 01. november 2017

Nice to see real emotion in this day-and-age of staged responses.

Coastal Cruiser. | 01. november 2017

Thanks for the post KP.

On the one hand some great lessons within the entirety of the piece, not the least of which is a horrifying example of the result of entrenched interests and inflexible mind sets. Also some great sound bites demonstrating the impotence of politicians who carry only oratory and bafoonism in their bag of tricks.

On the other hand it would have been great to see the 60 minutes gal actually ask some penetrating questions, rather than the rather superficial, knee jerk questions she spouted... coupled with some background facts for the piece that would enable viewers to put the solution provided by that sized battery into perspective.

Regardless, it should certainly be clear that Musk was offering an actual solution to the problem, and Australians who viewed the show should be less tolerant of those wising to maintain the status quo. I doubt if the next time the man in the bow tie is interviewed his answer to the question as to whether he has home solar (one of her better questions) will be something other than "No". ;>

Coastal Cruiser. | 01. november 2017

CORRECTION: I suspect that the next time the man in the bow tie is interviewed his answer to the question as to whether he has home solar (one of her better questions) will be something other than "No". ;>

jordanrichard | 01. november 2017

I saw that piece on Youtube and it frustrated me to no end that they never said specifically why electricity is so expensive there in the first place, or did I miss that?

blue adept | 01. november 2017

Like I've said, the guy is a humanitarian who, apparently, is more concerned with doing what he can to save Humanity than he is for earning money and providing energy sources other than coal or oil-fired electricity generation is one way to make that goal happen.

jpcollins9 | 01. november 2017

An article in the Sydney Morning Herald outlined a number of issues including $45 billion spent on transmission lines and other network upgrades of "pretty questionable value." The article describes that most of that was spent in anticipation of a surge in electricity demand and the threat of rolling blackouts . It also describes that the increase in demand didn't happen, mostly because of the increase in adoption of solar nationwide. The price per KWH is attributed to a few things: the wholesale price (coal is plentiful in Australia and low cost); the infrastructure cost ($45 billion as an example), and the retail price (more than tripled since 2008/) The author finishes with this- " So, why do they charge us so much for electricity? The best answer may be simply that they can."

http://www.smh.com.au/business/sunday-explainer-why-is-electricity-so-ex...

SamO | 01. november 2017

Australia is the perfect place for battery and solar "nodes" since the population of 20M is distributed in a country larger than the continental United States.

Why transmission lines?

Because they are "cost plus" for electricity systems that often function like large HMOs, charging huge fees and delivering "fuck-all" except higher rates.

Elon is going to kick them squarely in the nuts.