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Loss of Range After Accident

Loss of Range After Accident

My car was rear-ended in December by someone going over 50 mph. Finally got the car back several weeks ago. My car is a LeMR and had 13,320 miles when the accident occurred. It was built in November 2018. Over the year that I owned the car, the range had dropped but was always somewhere between 248-255. Once I received the car back, the range is now 228. This doesn't seem right. It literally sat for 4-1/2 months while been repaired and in that time it dropped 20 miles of range. I'm now driving a Standard model which isn't horrible EXCEPT that I paid $10,000 more for my car. My question is has anyone else experienced this? I set up an appointment to take it to the SC which will be on Thursday. I'm preparing myself for them to cancel the appointment and tell me they checked the car remotely and there's no problems, and that degradation of the battery is normal. I realize that degradation of the battery does occur but I think this is excessive and after a serious collision. Thanks for any help thrown my way.

Magic 8 Ball | 19 maj 2020

Your car is still in compliance with the battery warranty.

vmulla | 19 maj 2020

@Mary,
I do not think there is anything wrong with your battery; the long duration where the battery was unused might have affected your range estimate.
Here's my observation on range estimate when the car is lightly used: https://forums.tesla.com/forum/forums/estimated-mileage-low-usage
I expect your range estimate to crawl back up as you start putting miles on your car; my range has improved a little since my post.

stingray.don | 19 maj 2020

You may want to try deep cycling the battery a few times and see if it provides a more accurate estimate.

Joshan | 19 maj 2020

@vmulla +1

Likely a simple calibration issue from sitting so long and a few cycles of the battery will get it to start averaging back out.

Estimated range is NOT how to judge battery degradation, that is not its purpose.

hokiegir1 | 19 maj 2020

@vmulla +1

I'd noticed my LR was dropping recently while we weren't using it as much either, but having had other similar dips over the last 51k miles, we took a long drive that included a supercharge from low SOC, and ending at home with about 3%...and now it's been working it's way back up some. I had dropped as low as 293 in mid-April, but I'm now at 302. Also note that temperatures play some part in that -- so the cooler temps will reflect a lower projection.

aperfectecho | 19 maj 2020

Keep in mind that is an estimate. Tesla could easily "pin" your car's range at the high end, and then your range might simply decrease faster in actual use. Try a deep cycle of the battery, and it usually resets the estimate. Has done for me, a couple of times, and I usually only do it if it's reading a lower range for a while. I try to keep in mind it is an estimate only, and while range will gradually decrease with time, it's still pretty amazing

marym23 | 19 maj 2020

As I expected, just got the text as follows: "We pulled your vehicle up remotely, performed a battery health check, and found no alerts or readings that would point to any high voltage battery or related issue. It is normal for there to be some minor battery degradation early on in the vehicles life that will reduce the displayed range but it will plateau as the vehicle ages/mileage increases. Charging habits can also cause the displayed range to be slightly incorrect as it does not necessarily reflect the actual capacity of the vehicle but is based on an algorithm of battery readings over time. We have seen that when the battery is consistently used in shorter range trips, it doesn't see the bottom range of the battery (20-60% charge), or supercharging is the primary source of charging, it won't be as accurate."

Well this car has been supercharged 2 times in the 1-1/2 years that I've owned it. I use it mainly for work which is 25 miles each way so maybe that's considered short mileage trips. I'm going to take a deep breath and hope that Tesla is correct and that the range will plateau soon. Part of it is my own fault in purchasing the LeMR. I should have bought a long range but didn't want to spend the extra $4000. Instead I spent the extra $4000 but spent it towards getting red ($2500 at the time) and $1500 for 19" wheels. I have learned the hard way, more range is most important thing!!

M3phan | 19 maj 2020

This is a real suggestion: for a year I read about people suggesting switching from displaying miles to percentage before I tried it myself and now I’m so much more at peace… Switch your car battery read out from miles to percentage, and you won’t think twice about it ever again. At least I haven’t, I just look at the percentage like I used to look at my ice car’s gas tank… Is my battery half full, a quarter full, 3/4 full? Etc. Completely eliminated my obsession with watching the mileage and calculating it constantly. Now I just parked my car plug it in, unplug it in the morning drive off, have not thought about battery mileage estimates for about a year now.

TeslaTap.com | 19 maj 2020

@marym23 - Lots of good advice from posters above. I wrote this article last month to explain why the range indicator can be accurate and how to calibrate it. https://teslatap.com/articles/range-university/

It comes up a lot in the forums.

vmulla | 19 maj 2020

@marym23,
I think you made a great choice with an MR; I say that because you're only using the car for a 25mile commute and have only charged at superchargers a couple of times. It is a fantastic car that addresses all your needs and then some, and it was a good deal when compared to the other trims (I'm assuming you bought the car in late 2018). If I remember correctly, the price difference between LR and MR was more than 4K at that time.

marym23 | 19 maj 2020

@vmulla,

The price difference when I bought my car was $4000, purchased 11/2018. My commute is 50 miles total, 25 miles each way. Again, I wish I would've spent the $4000 on the range instead of color and wheels since I paid the same as a Black LR with 18" wheels. That's on me. And I get setting it to percentage instead of mileage but the few times that I'd like to take a road trip, I'm concerned about making it to the next supercharger. Only drove to Seattle from Portland once and Portland to Eugene. I had to stop and supercharge on both those trips but not for very long. I'd like to take a trip to the Bay Area to visit friends once this Corona virus thing is over. I'm not sure if I can do that and safely make it to the next supercharger. I know there's one in Eugene but the next one isn't until the Medford area. That's all. I'm probably worrying about something that I don't need to do. I didn't buy the car just to commute but to actually drive it where ever I want to go. Thanks for all the suggestions and hopefully I can get my mind around it and just not worry about it.

marym23 | 19 maj 2020

One last thought after I read the post by Tesla Tap. I guess what I should have said was I was concerned about the Rated Range of my car. I get all the stuff about how far you can go based on driving style and terrain. I owned a Nissan Leaf when they first came out. And actually I get about 15% better range than what the display shows as I only go 5 miles over the speed limit and drive at least 25 miles each time. As I stated before, it's about the distance between superchargers on a road trip. If I can make them without having to crawl along, then I'm good to go. Again, many thanks to everyone's responses.

Magic 8 Ball | 19 maj 2020

Always amazes me when people put form before function. Better to learn late than never.

Joshan | 19 maj 2020

@marym23 | don't worry about making the next supercharger when driving. As long as you have the route planned the car takes care of all that for you. It will tell you ever supercharger you need, the percentage your battery will be when you get there and more. It will also adjust for any variables during the drive and even advise the speed you should drive if required to make it.

The car worries about all the stuff for you. Likely the best thing I ever did was take a 2,000 mile road trip 3 weeks after buying the car in the middle of winter.

vmulla | 19 maj 2020

@marym23,
You're going to be just fine with the range on your car. I say that based on all the bits of information you shared and also based on my own experience with a lower range Tesla MS60. My older Tesla had a total range of 220 miles, and I traveled across Eastern USA without much planning - and this was years ago when the supercharger network was relatively light.

Take a trip after this unfortunate health situation passes, and you'll realize you've not been giving enough credit to the car and supercharger network.

httran26 | 19 maj 2020

I have over 32k miles on my LR RWD. Normally my range would drop over time. Then I would take a long road trip where I would top up the car at max or near max. After my trip, I notice that my estimated range would slowly go up. So I concluded that it is good to cycle the battery high and then low once in a while so the cells can balance.

Now that covid19 has hit, I haven't been driving much. My car is sitting in the garage not plugged in at 45-65% SOC. Once it drops below 40%, I top it up at a supercharger to about 75%. Looking at my range estimate, I noticed that usually after a supercharge, my estimated range tend to edge up for a few days after. I started covid-19 incubation at 298 est miles. Now I'm at 308.

So now I'm thinking maybe it's the supercharging that makes range go up.

https://imgur.com/a/6bjrdPc

erniejenson1 | 19 maj 2020

You waited 4 1/2 months to get your car and you lost 20 miles range from the battery? The degregation will occur if the battery is left discharged. How many months did it sit in a discharged condition. If the car sat with 150 miles range and the battery was isolated from the car by pulling the black plug under the rear seat then there would be very little to no degreation. Did any air bags get discharged. That opens the pyro fuse and isolates the battery also. Who stored the car?

Atoms | 19 maj 2020

Cycle your battery once from a few percent up to 100% and down to 80% and see if this fixes it. Also make sure your wheels are aligned.

marym23 | 19 maj 2020

@erniejensen1, I did not store the car. It took the body shop that long to repair my car. One of my concerns was that when the car got hit, all power from the 12 volt battery stopped. The car had to be towed and the body shop had a big problem with the 12 volt battery. It was giving codes that it was toast and they had to keep it on a charger and then suddenly there was nothing wrong with it. They took the car to the local SC who replaced the 12 volt battery and said everything was fine. Since this body shop is a certified Tesla shop, I would think they would know what to do. Tesla SC actually referred me to them. The air bags did not go off since I was hit in the back but it caused something in the drivers seatbelt that caused the shortage of the 12 volt battery. I don’t understand the entire thing but I know it took 3 weeks just to get the parts to move the car inside and do a tear down. Ended up costing just over $29,000 to repair and as I said 4-1/2 months.