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Convoys?

Convoys?

Are there any folks who have convoy arrangements with other owners on their regular commutes? My understanding is EAP will allow the vehicle to follow the vehicle ahead more closely than would be recommended for a human driver? If so, X Teslas in convoy would occupy less highway than X ICE vehicles. Although the future is FSD and super-tight convoys thanks to V2V communications, that is years away. It occurred to me in the meantime a coordinated (albeit somewhat manual) convoy effort utilizing EAP could be a great ad, as well as a small way of trying to reduce congestion on the busiest highways.

ebiggs | 10 augusti 2017

I don't believe convoy technology is on the near horizon. They are working on platooning Semi trucks, but I think that's more about having the leader be a human driver and trailing vehicles being autonomous.

V2V communication hardware is probably a long ways off, and I think regulators are definitely going to slow that process down since they'll want an open standard that all auto manufacturers can participate in to be able to realize the dream of autonomous-only city zones to clear up congestion: no traffic lights, no lanes, no speed limits = huge efficiency gain!

ebiggs | 10 augusti 2017

I don't believe convoy technology is on the near horizon. They are working on platooning Semi trucks, but I think that's more about having the leader be a human driver and trailing vehicles being autonomous.

V2V communication hardware is probably a long ways off, and I think regulators are definitely going to slow that process down since they'll want an open standard that all auto manufacturers can participate in to be able to realize the dream of autonomous-only city zones to clear up congestion: no traffic lights, no lanes, no speed limits = huge efficiency gain!

jordanrichard | 11 augusti 2017

"convoy technology"?. With even AP1 you could easily have a convoy of Tesla's going down the highway. Have everyone set there distance to the same number and the lead car sets the pace, or am I missing something here?

ReD eXiLe ms us | 13 augusti 2017

I believe that in certain States, Convoys, like Parades, are closely regulated. I doubt that many safety organizations allow any type of close following, such as drafting, on highways. They would generally prefer that you leave several car lengths between vehicles.

However, the NHTSA is not actually slowing things down when it comes to vehicle automation at all. They are making a concerted effort to get ahead of technologies they know are coming and to prepare proactive solutions for dealing with them. The text below is from a 4-page PDF file I found on the NHTSA's website...

THE ROAD AHEAD, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Strategic Plan, 2016—2020

Message From the Administrator

At the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), where our mission is to save lives on American roads, we often talk about two very important numbers: 35,092 and 94.

In 2015, 35,092 people lost their lives on our roads, a 7.2-percent increase over 2014. Those aren't just numbers. These were our children, parents, spouses, friends, neighbors, and colleagues. They were somebody’s everything.

The second number is 94. That's the percentage of crashes caused by human choice or error. That's a fatal decision to get behind the wheel after drinking. It's the decision to speed through an intersection as a light is changing, or the inability to brake fast enough to avoid the person who just sped through. It's the decision to drive after a sleepless night or to send one more text from behind the wheel to let someone know you're on your way.

These two numbers are a call to action, because, frankly, at NHTSA we are working to create a future where no one dies on our roads. How then, do we get to zero fatalities from a near-term record high? We know we can't do more of the same and expect a different result. This plan is our renewed commitment to our many successful safety programs, and our dedication to finding innovative tools that save lives.

In January 2016, we announced the Proactive Safety Principles, a historic agreement between the U.S. Department of Transportation, NHTSA, and 18 automakers on a set of broad-ranging actions to help avoid the type of safety crisis that led to record-setting safety recalls. This approach is already yielding results and we're excited about its future potential.

We also embrace the lifesaving potential of automated vehicle technologies. Too often we talk about a tension between safety and innovation. A study we did showed that over 50 years, basic safety technologies such as seat belts and air bags saved 613,501 lives. Yet those technologies were also once controversial.

On September 20, 2016, the U.S. DOT and NHTSA announced the Federal Automated Vehicles Policy, a proactive, four-part measure designed to help facilitate the safe testing and deployment of automated vehicles nationwide. This approach is an unprecedented move by the Federal Government to harness the enormous safety and mobility potential of these technologies, maintaining oversight and authority, while allowing innovators to develop bold new safety and mobility solutions.

However, we can't wait until that revolution is here to address the toughest challenge in front of us: the 94 percent of crashes caused by human choice or error. We seek new strategies and new partners to help people make the right choices on the road. This fall, we convened a behavioral safety summit to lay out a roadmap to deal with issues like impaired driving, distracted and drowsy driving, and speeding.

Transportation touches every part of our lives, and the solutions to the challenges we face must likewise come from all of us. I'm confident that with NHTSA's mission-driven staff and our many dedicated stakeholders, we can make a real difference in all of our lives in the years to come. -- Mark R. Rosekind, Ph.D., Administrator

https://www.nhtsa.gov/sites/nhtsa.dot.gov/files/documents/12532-nhtsa-st...

Self-Driving Cars -- Communicators Mark Rosekind, Sep 28 2016 | Video | C-SPAN.org
https://www.c-span.org/video/?415947-1/communicators-mark-rosekind

Haggy | 15 augusti 2017

I wouldn't want to be the one obstructing traffic when somebody wants to change lanes and car after car leaves no room to do so.

AJPHL | 15 augusti 2017

@Haggy that's already an issue sometimes for me because of congestion and tailgating. A Tesla convoy could use an inside lane to mitigate.

jefjes | 15 augusti 2017

2 second rule?

JuJo0 | 15 augusti 2017

@jefjes

Maybe for city driving. At 70 mph on a freeway, a 2 second rule is quite a big gap :) By that time, 2 car* rule would be more common.

jordanrichard | 15 augusti 2017

I don't know if this applies to all states, but here in CT, a convoy is illegal. Personally I don't know why, but it is. I don't see the difference between 10 cars, being a mix of Hondas, Chevys, Fords etc, in one lane traveling, than 10 Tesla's or 10 Mustangs. I am only guessing but perhaps the assumption is that if it is an organized group of cars, that those part of the "convoy" would not let anyone cut in to exit or enter the highway.

carlk | 15 augusti 2017

It does not work this way, not yet at least. I needed to set the distance to 1 when I'm using my AP1 so I would not leave too large a distance to upset cars behind me.

carlk | 15 augusti 2017

That's when I'm driving on the fast lane. I can leave larger distances without any issue on the slow lanes.

RedPillSucks | 15 augusti 2017

@JuJo0
Doesn't the 2 second rule relate to human response time between noticing an issue and reacting to it, and the car doing its thing? The two second rule would automatically the following distance based on speed. For those that think 2 second is a long time, that's for the margin of error factor.

rxlawdude | 15 augusti 2017

Hey @RedPillSucks, from your moniker do you prefer the little blue pill? (Sorry, pharmacist joke.) :-)

Shock | 15 augusti 2017

The concept is sound. There's no reason why when computers are driving our cars we couldn't be a foot away from the one in front of us. It would decrease congestion and greatly increase mpg[e].

AJPHL | 15 augusti 2017

@Shock yep that's the long-term goal/expectation. In the meantime, curious to read of anyone's experiences participating in such convoys. With an upcoming surge in the number of EAP-capable Teslas on the road, what etiquette is there around forming ad hoc convoys of Teslas in real-time as you encounter other Teslas on the highway? Do current owners see close following by an unknown Tesla as tailgating for instance? I'm imagining a Waze-like app where I can create a convoy (up to my preferred limit) that other users can join for all or part of my route as & when they want. I'd specify the preferred following distance that all convoy participants are expected to adhere to. Drivers in the convoy would be notified when another Tesla intends to join so that everyone knows who is in the convoy at any point in time, and when drivers intend to leave the highway.

carlgo2 | 15 augusti 2017

jordanrichard is right. Convoys essentially cut off the other lanes, other drivers can't change lanes and get to exits. I also see a huge amount of resentment at seeing an imposing line of cars dominating a lane. And if there was one convoy, there would be others as well, dominating other lanes, creating moving walls. Add to that the huge domineering and likely frightening lines of huge trucks doing this. This is not a good idea. Increase range in other ways.

carlgo2 | 15 augusti 2017

And, oh boy, Tesla exclusive convoys. Expect every Supercharger to be vandalized within hours...

jordanrichard | 15 augusti 2017

Well it cuts off other lanes if the cars in the convoy dont let people cross through.

Mike83 | 15 augusti 2017

Tesla Lane. minimum speed 110 mph. A car can leave the convoy from any place and the other cars pull up. A car can join in at the end of the convoy. The right lanes for regular cars. Maybe in California on I-5. A 6 hour drive becomes 3-4 hours.
Just a potential scenario.

topher | 16 augusti 2017

Why do people keep trying to turn trucks into trains, without actually using trains instead? The efficiency savings are huge. The highway maintenance reduction is huge.

Thank you kindly.

Model_D | 16 augusti 2017

Vehicle to vehicle communication is alredy available. I think Cadillac has a car with it already.

Tesla2018 | 20 augusti 2017

We had vehicle to vehicle communication back in the1970's
It was called a CB radio!
I go on a Toy for Tots Rally with about 300 cars each year. The state police shut down I95 and escort us. They tell us to keep a safe distance. The only problem is that we are going about 100 mph and then we slow down to around 60 as the troopers leapfrog between the entrance ramps to stop other cars from going on the highway. When we slow down it creates an accordian effect where the cars get to close to each other as we slow down.Not all cars have the exact same braking ability because of the weight of the car, tire capibilities, etc. so the exact same distance cant always be maintained.Look at Nascar for example. They all are on each others bumpers but if one car slows down or slides the ones behind it cant brake in time. Worst case scenario in a Tesla is that one car would follow another one into a similar slide.

In a convoy situation if the cars are in the center lane of a 3 lane road and come across a tractor trailer that is doing 65 trying to pass another tractor trailer doing 64 in the right lane a convoy mode would either force all the cars to get stuck behind the slow moving truck in front of them or allow some cars to move to the left lane and cause others not to because other cars may already be going fast in the left lane and not leaving room for all cars to move into the other lane.